Ouch! The best foods to eat when…

Ouch! The best foods to eat when…

Most of us love eating. We love sugary food, fatty food, crunchy, spicy, and salty foods. But are these the best things for us to eat when we are having oral health complications? We’ve compiled a guide full of yummy and appropriate foods for you to eat based on the oral health issue you currently face.

Braces

Braces are often a rite of passage for young people. Though the results are stunning the process can be daunting. Often they result in months and even years of a throbbing mouth. Each visit to the orthodontist is typically followed by several days of achiness.

Soft foods are your friend here. We suggest eating foods that are not easily stuck in your braces and pose the risk of breaking them. Food included in this list are bananas, mashed potatoes, yogurt, soups, and pasta.

Foods to avoid include crunchy foods like popcorn and tortilla chips. These can get wedged in the wires and cause bad bacteria to grow over time. Additionally, don’t snack on nuts or raw vegetables as these foods can damage and break your braces. We understand that the last thing you want is an emergency trip to the dentist because your wires snap!

Wisdom Teeth and other Oral Surgery

Many people have their wisdom Teeth removed at some point in their life. It is a relatively easy surgery with a relatively short recovery. However, it is still important to follow your doctor’s orders after the surgery. Eating things you shouldn’t can cause major oral health problems!

When you have your wisdom teeth removed you may experience soreness for 7 – 14 days. That means you may feel more comfortable eating soft and cold foods like smoothies. Since using a straw during your recovery period is prohibited, we recommend you stick to soup, applesauce, yogurt, and other things that can be eaten with a spoon.

Canker Sores

Even though you may love spicy or sour food, they aren’t your friend when you’ve got a canker sore. It is best to buckle up and opt in for bland options when you have a canker sore. Your body forms canker sores when you are short on nutrients like folic acid, vitamin B12, and zinc. Due to this deficiency you can reduce and even eliminate canker sores by eating foods that are rich in these resources. For example, you can eat salmon, which is rich in B12, leafy green vegetables to make up folic acid deficiency, and yogurt to replenish your bodies’ Zinc supplies.

If you suffer from canker sores often you should watch out for sneaky foods that are generally regarded as healthy but may contain too much salt or spice. Foods to avoid include coffee, tomatoes, and prepackaged snack nuts.

Dry Mouth

It may seem obvious that when you suffer from dry mouth it is best to increase your water and liquid intake; however there is more to the solution that simply adding moisture to your diet. We suggest filling your diet with high protein foods that aren’t too hard or crunchy. A good example of high protein food with plenty of moisture is fresh red meat. Foods that are dry and salty like bread or crackers can exacerbate the complications that come along with dry mouth. Soup, stew, and yogurt are also great additions to your ‘dry mouth diet’. Additionally, if you can avoid citrus and substitute in other fresh fruit you may be able to reduce dry mouth symptoms.

In general, there are several things you can do to maintain a healthy mouth and avoid complications. We suggest that throughout your lifetime you eat plenty of fruit, vegetables, water, and protein. You should also avoid sugar as often as you can. Sugar is known to be a large contributor to tooth decay and bad health in general.

Are e-cigarettes bad for oral health?

Are e-cigarettes bad for oral health?

It is a commonly known fact that smoking cigarettes is bad for your oral health. Smoking causes tooth decay, tooth staining, gum disease, and in some cases even mouth cancer. Though traditional cigarettes are said to be worse for your mouth than smoking the new electronic cigarettes, new research shows that may not be the case.

If you smoke electronic cigarettes you may notice that you often struggle with bad breath. This is because electronic cigarettes contain the highly addictive and dangerous chemical called nicotine. Nicotine causes the mouth’s natural production of saliva to slow down, which often causes dry mouth, plaque build up, and even tooth decay.

Fortunately, e-cigarettes don’t contain many of the teeth staining chemicals that traditional ones do. For example, they don’t produce the smoke or contain tar which both stain teeth yellow. However, when e-cigarettes contain high nicotine level, the liquid does eventually begin to yellow and has some of the same staining effects.

The vapor created by burning the liquid in e-cigarettes was originally thought to be harmless to consumers but as more research is conducted it is becoming increasingly evident that this is not the case. In fact, “when the vapors from an e-cigarette are burned, it causes cells to release inflammatory proteins, which in turn aggravate stress within cells, resulting in damage that could lead to various oral diseases”(Irfan Rahman, Ph.D.). This causes growing uncertainty regarding the safety of this wildly popular cigarette alternative. Little information regarding the ingredients in e-cigarettes is disclosed to the consumer. Most users have almost no information regarding the content of the product they are consuming on a daily basis, and many “e-juices” are produced overseas with little to no regulation.

Additionally, the Journal of Cellular Physiology published an article that stated over a period of three days the vapor created by e-cigarettes killed 53% of mouth cells. The deterioration of healthy mouth cells can lead to infection and a whole host of other oral health issues.

Overall, the extent to which e-cigarettes are detrimental to oral health is unclear. However, based on current research it is difficult to deny they cause damage if used regularly. We would recommend that our patients discontinue or severely reduce using e-cigarette products.

Make Oral Health Fun for the Family

Make Oral Health Fun for the Family

It can be difficult to explain the importance of oral health to children. Understandably, most are more concerned with playing than with the current and future state of their gums. We have compiled some creative ways you can teach your whole family how to maintain healthy teeth.

One idea to increase receptiveness to the twice daily brushing routine is to let your kids pick a 2-3 minute long song to play while they brush their teeth. This ensures that they brush long enough while also making the task sound a whole lot more appealing. Be warned, if tooth brushing turns into a groovy dance party, watch out for those toothbrushes becoming a hazard! A sand timer also works well if you aren’t able to play music.

Another way to add fun to oral health is by giving your child more control over the details when they brush their teeth. For example, you should change your toothbrush every three months, and you can make this a fun task for kids by letting them pick a toothbrush themed with their favorite TV characters or toys. This will help your child feel more invested and in control of their brushing routine. Additionally, you can allow them to choose the flavor of their toothpaste. Believe it or not, most kids aren’t thrilled with the taste of plain peppermint. They usually enjoy flavors like watermelon and bubblegum much more.

A great way to combine learning about oral health with gaining time management skills is to create a brushing calendar for kids in which they get a sticker each time they brush their teeth. Motivate them by offering a reward at the end of the month if there are no missed days!

On days when keeping up with oral health means actually going to a dentist appointment, we recommend making it a field trip day. For example, when you make an appointment with your doctor you can also plan something fun as a reward for your child’s bravery. After they get their teeth cleaned, head to the zoo or the park so that they will associate their dental appointments with sunshine and good times.

Finally, to continue education about the long-term importance of oral health with your child, try buying an oral health educational coloring book for kids so they can learn about eating nutritious foods and staying on top of their oral health while they play. If you your kids are tech savvy, there are also tons of great resources for learning at Mouthhealthykids.org. This website allows you to access fun quizzes and other oral health learning tools for kids.

What your Smile Says About You

What your Smile Says About you

Our smile is one of the first things we use to communicate with others when we have a conversation or meet someone for the first time. How we choose to present our smile to others can say a lot about our personality, health, and how we want others to see us. While clothes and other accessories may depict our style or what’s currently trending, our smile and the shine of our teeth give others a peek into our eating habits, genetics, and how comfortable we are with ourselves. Living in a society where we pride ourselves on the condition of how straight or bright our teeth are can be make looking at someone’s smile an interesting starting point in knowing the not-so-obvious traits a person has.

In terms of personality, how we smile in a social setting can tell us a lot about the people we surround ourselves with. A person who doesn’t show their teeth in a photograph may tell you that that person is shy or reserved compared to a person who shows all of their teeth and has a wide smile on their face, which most of the time, we interpret as confidence and expressing happiness.

Let’s go back and compare today to the 19th and early 20th century when it was customary not to smile in photographs. Everyone appeared to be somber, even children. It was hypothesized that because cameras where a new and developing technology, the exposure time to capture an image took as long as one minute and expressions couldn’t be held for the duration it took to capture a picture. A second theory as to why people didn’t smile in their photographs was due to the fact that they did not have good dental hygiene and, thus, were self-conscious about their smile.

As the decades went by, smirks began to sneak in and eventually smiling was an acceptable form of appearing in a photograph that lead us to where we are today. As dental hygiene methods improved, as well as quicker exposure times for camera technology, people began to show their pearly whites.

The color and shape of someone’s teeth are unique to the individual and it is natural for teeth to have a yellow tinge of color to them. However, modern dentistry has helped us improve the appearance of our teeth and now many people opt to have bright, white teeth and love to show them off in selfies. In fact, the Teeth Whitening Industry in 2015 made over $11 billion with an additional $1.4 billion spent on teeth whitening products according to the American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry.

Our teeth are often considered as a part of ourselves that we present to others. It is important to keep them in shape and take care of them just like any other part of our body. By scheduling routine maintenance and dental cleanings every six months and with proper daily brushing and flossing, you will keep those teeth white, bright, and camera ready well into your golden years.

All you Need to Know about Antibiotics

All you Need to Know about Antibiotics

When we have a bacterial infection, our immune system kicks in to try to rid our bodies of harmful pathogens. While fighting off foreign bacteria, the immune system sends white blood cells and antibodies to find, destroy, and repair any damage that may have been caused which often results in us feeling sick. The problem with bacterial infections is that the bacteria multiply at a rapid rate making it difficult for the immune system to respond and treat the illness quick enough. However, modern medicine has developed a way to speed up the battle our immune system takes each time a bad bacteria invades our bodies. Antibiotics are prescribed when we are fighting off a bacterial infection and typically help speed up the recovery process.

Essentially, antibiotics work by targeting the pathogens causing the damage and killing the bad bacteria while also slowing down or putting a stop to their harmful multiplication cycle. This in turn allows our bodies to take care of the remaining infection and within a week or two we begin to start feeling like our normal selves.

The problem with antibiotics is that while it kills off bad bacteria, it also rids our bodies of good bacteria as well. Our bodies maintain a balance of bacteria naturally within our digestive system and sometimes when antibiotics are prescribed, this balance can be thrown out of whack. Many doctors, regardless of what bacterial infection you may be experiencing, often recommend to supplement your antibiotic prescription with yogurt to replenish good bacteria.

Another problem with antibiotics is that while they act as a miracle drug to many bacterial infectious diseases, many people do not complete their entire set of prescribed antibiotics. Sometimes we start to feel better after just taking a few days of antibiotics and because of that stop taking what remains in the prescription. This is troublesome because it gives the opportunity for pathogens that remain in our body to find ways to react to the antibiotic and mutate a resistance towards it, making it less effective and harder to fight off the next time we get sick. Unlike a viral infection where a virus is always changing it’s gene pool, bacteria are somewhat stable in their genetic makeup, until they find ways to mutate and combat antibiotics.

The over prescribing of antibiotics is also a cause for concern. It is estimated that 70% of illness causing germs are resistant to at least one antibiotic. In 2015 it was estimated that there were 50,000 deaths due to resistant antibiotic germs. The primary reason of resistant antibiotic germs is excessive use of antibiotics. When we are given antibiotics, it is important to finish all of the pills given to us and that when we are taking medication to be sure it is for something that our immune system needs assistance with in order to get better. Antibiotics have been used for years and have helped us cure many terrible bacterial diseases such as pneumonia, mouth infections, and much more. Without the advent of antibiotics, we would be living in a much more difficult world.

Halloween Can be Spooky for Your Teeth Too

Halloween Can be Spooky for Your Teeth Too

Halloween is upon us and you want to know what’s spooky? Sugar is the biggest component to the cause of dental decay. Yes, that’s right, the sugar you and your families are about to soon get a lot of. Tricks and treats and you won’t need to smell their feet because cavities are just as near. What are some tips you can use so that you don’t lose out on celebrating Halloween?

1. Brush your teeth after you or your kids eats candy. Brushing your teeth is the easiest and most efficient way to get that candy off of your teeth. Sticky, chewy candy is the worst for oral hygiene and it’s important to get all that sugar residue off as soon as possible. If left on the teeth, the sugar will cause plaque to build up and teeth to start decaying.
2. Encourage your kid to rinse with mouthwash after eating the candy. If we remove even some of the sugar by mouth rinsing, we are reducing the risk of decay. If you’re not near your toothbrush, just a quick swish will do. Again it’s about neutralizing the sugar and getting the candy off of your teeth quickly after eating it.
3. Your kids don’t have to eat all of the candy, after a few weeks reduce the load so the candy consumption will not go on forever. While there are a few reasons to avoid eating all your candy in one sitting, try to think of it as preserving the stash. Your teeth and body will thank you if you don’t overload on the sugar all at one time.

Kids are most likely to develop dental decay for a lot of reasons, so be sure this time of year to be on top of their brushing. It’s so important to celebrate holidays with your family, use it as an opportunity to teach your little ones how to take care of themselves while still enjoying themselves. Upset tummies and tooth decay, be gone, because now you and your mouth are armed to the teeth with tips.

The Amazing Bioactive Glass Filling

The Amazing Bioactive Glass Filling

It’s about that time of year when your kids are going to unload pillowcases full of candy. Even if you’re not tempted (kudos to you, you’re doing better than most of us), it probably reminds you of the sweet sticky memories of your own Halloween’s past. Maybe all that sugar led to a cavity of your own, or maybe you had a filling pulled out by a tootsie roll. Whatever the case may be, the fact of the matter is: candy can cause cavities.

Shocking I know, but cavity-havers can breathe a small sigh of relief. Scientists in London have developed new dental material for their fillings, Bioactive Glass. This new material not only blocks decay development, but it can repair any decay that may start to grow. Fillings made with bioactive glass have been proven to make fillings last not only as well as traditional materials, but also for a lot longer.

Eventually all fillings will fail. It’s the nature of things. Bioactive glass has been shown to slow secondary tooth decay and provide minerals that could replace those that have been lost. The antimicrobial effect of bioactive glass is proving to be great for the mouth’s ecosystem. The glass releases ions such as those that are from calcium and phosphate that usually have a toxic effect on oral bacteria, but actually are neutralizing the local acidic environment. The bioactive glass composites release fluoride as well as calcium and phosphate, the needed materials for tooth minerals. Compounds such as silicon oxide, phosphorus oxide, and calcium oxide are the compounds that land the glass its ‘bioactive’ surname. These oxides interact with the body, unlike polymer and other modern tooth fillings.

Even though technology keeps improving our mouths at an astonishing rate, good ol’ oral hygiene habits go a long way. So whoever’s eating the candy this month, (yeah, we know you are too) be sure your little ones are brushing all that gunk off of their teeth. Don’t forget to floss! If you notice a post trick-or-treat toothache, be sure you schedule an appointment with me so we can get you all taken care of.

The Flossing Feud

The Flossing Feud

As unpopular as flossing may be, the recent post from the Associate Press that claims it’s not important at all, is pure baloney. As much as we’d all like to believe flossing isn’t important, and excitedly cross that off our nightly ritual, countless years of studies have proven flossing’s effectiveness. If you want to keep your mouth healthy, you better keep that string moving.

Most dentists agree on the importance of flossing. With so many years of experience I can tell you that I’ve seen the benefits of flossing, first hand. Not only is plaque removal vital to the sustainability of a healthy oral ecosystem – flossing plays a direct role in removing plaque from the teeth. The trick is to make sure you’re flossing in a C-shape around each tooth. Flossing with intention rather than haphazardly makes a world of difference.

There are so many options available for flossing as well, if you don’t like standard string floss, technology has created water powered flossers for you home. These use gentle water pressure to remove plaque and are very effective in cleaning all your teeth but for those who don’t want to spend extra money on a flossing device, good old traditional floss does the trick just fine.

The studies that were ran that allegedly disproved the notion of flossing haven’t been running as long as the studies that prove its effectiveness. Preventing tooth decay in the long run, into our older years, starts with good flossing habits young. Maintaining the integrity of your mouth is a lifelong battle that’s best set-up for success early on.

Not to mention there are specific people who benefit from flossing more than perhaps the average person. People who suffer dry mouth or who drink coffee or eat other acidic or high – carbohydrate diets will see an improvement in their mouth through flossing. Since these things aid in plaque production, removing it from the source every day becomes especially important to avoid the onset of gingivitis. Flossing also strengthens the gum line so that means when you see your dentist there’s less discomfort and bleeding than in the patients who don’t floss.

Although new data keeps being released all the time about what’s really effective and what’s not, I can say from firsthand experience that I’m pro-flossing, as are most dentists. So when you come to visit me for your next checkup, you’ll still be hearing that timeless reminder to keep floss in your daily care routine.

Guided Bone Regeneration

Guided Bone Regeneration

Guided bone regeneration surgery is a dental procedure that uses the barrier membranes in a patient’s mouth to help guide and direct the growth of new bone and tissue in areas with insufficient volumes. This procedure is mainly for prosthetic restoration in patients with dental implants although esthetic restoration is sometimes used as well.

Guided bone regeneration is applied in the oral cavity to support new hard tissue growth to allow stable placement of dental implants. A very reliable and successful procedure when using bone grafting with guided bone regeneration.

The use of barrier membranes to help direct bone regeneration is not a new practice and the theoretical practices date back to 1959. By excluding unwanted cells from lining healing sites, the growth of desired tissues is much easier. Positive clinical results of regeneration led to the focus on the potential for re-building alveolar bone defects using regeneration. The theory of regeneration was challenged in the use of dentistry for awhile, but is now seeing a resurgence in positive clinical trials as a safe and effective treatment.

With the use of dental implants becoming widespread and predictable for the restoration of missing teeth and other cases, it’s clear the regenerative technique is an important step which assists the process of bone regeneration. The clinical success of implant therapy was taken from the direct anchorage of the implant in the bone tissue without the interposition of fibrous tissue. Clinical trials have been positive in proving to promote bone growth.

Guided bone regeneration has been reported as a reliable and successful means for augmenting bone regrowth in the case of vertical and horizontal defects in particularly edentulous patients. The data pulled from these implants suggests that GBR should be considered a safe technique to obtain bone formation and placing dental implants, especially in cases in which it would be otherwise impossible.

As patients with dental implants increase, so has the demand of treatment protocols that take less time and require fewer surgeries. With GBR, the patient undergoes a surgical procedure once, placed with initial stability, so the tissues regrow back without any pockets or problems that will cause the implants to uproot from there. It is clear that the use of a regenerative technique with dental implant placement is an important step which assists the process of a bone regeneration. Isolating the bone defect from the surrounding connective tissues provides bone-forming cells with access to a secluded space intended for the regeneration to take place.

The evolution of surgical techniques, awareness of tissue without the interposition of fibrous tissue, and the considerable research conducted to promote bone growth have all led to positive, safe, results.

Based on the research, GBR is not only a safe and effective technique for obtaining bone formation, but also makes dental implants available in situations where it would not otherwise be possible.

How Being Pregnant can Change Your Mouth

How Being Pregnant can Change Your Mouth

Being pregnant is such a magical time, bringing with it, glowing skin, luxurious hair, and fantastic nails. Those same hormones that bring you your pregnancy glow are the same hormones responsible for the changes you may also experience in your mouth. Due to this constantly changing hormonal state the gums become very sensitive, and pregnant women may find themselves more vulnerable to oral problems. These discomforts can manifest in a few different ways, but with a diligent maintenance routine, they’re easily manageable.
Pregnant women may find that they become more susceptible to gingivitis because of their changing hormonal state. It is a mild form of gum disease that causes your gums to be red, tender and sore or irritated. Keeping your teeth clean, with flossing and mouthwash diligently on top of brushing, should keep the susceptibility of the disease developing very unlikely. If for whatever reason you’re experiencing any symptoms that look like gingivitis, go to your dentist before the problem worsens. Gingivitis can become a serious issue if not treated and taken care of appropriately.
What you eat is also really important when you’re thinking about how to take care of your teeth. Being sure you’re stocked up on vitamins and healthy snacks are a great way to keep your Ph balance in check and keeps your teeth and bones strong and healthy. Also keep in mind that whatever you eat, you also pass down to your developing little one. Although cravings can be a humorous aspect of pregnancy, as your appetite increases with your growing body and baby, keep in mind that mindless snacking can be an invitation to plaque. Foods that are low in sugar and nutritious for both of you are things like, raw fruits and vegetables, and/or yogurts and cheeses. Your physician will be able to provide advice as to what foods to avoid and enjoy while pregnant.
Morning sickness is a less fun side effect of growing a little one, but it happens to almost every woman. Unfortunately, on top of being uncomfortable, vomiting can also be detrimental to tooth health. The rising acid levels eat away at your enamel, and some women who experience many months of morning sickness can also experience unpleasant mouth symptoms. If you are getting sick frequently, be sure to take extra care of your teeth and mouth. An easy swish with a mix of baking soda and water will neutralize any acid left hanging around and will protect the integrity of your teeth.
It’s safe to go to your dentist at any point during your pregnancy if you’re having uncomfortable symptoms or have questions about oral changes. Dentists, like doctors, are well versed in handling dental care at any point of a person’s life and if you’ve been with your dentist a while, like most of my patients have, they’ll be excited to see you during this beautiful and exciting time of your life. A little extra TLC will go a long way in protecting your new, slightly more sensitive teeth so be sure you’re flossing with every brush and not skipping.
Never hesitate to get your dentist’s opinion on anything that may pop up that you’re not sure about. Sometimes mild canker sores and ulcers can form due to the changing hormones, if you have a question, contact us! I’m always happy to see and answer any questions my patients may have so I can support and be excited for them on the next chapter in their lives.